Mad Water by Nicholas C. Rossis

Set against a world where the remnants of successive civilisations co-exist and technology has mostly been lost, Rossis weaves a tale of ordinary people struggling to choose the least worst option. This book is the second in the Pearseus series. As such, this review might contain some spoilers for Rise of the Prince. The shadowy … Continue reading Mad Water by Nicholas C. Rossis

Advertisements

You’re in for a Ride: A Collection of Science Fiction Short Stories

Combining thought-provoking ideas and sudden reframing with pared down prose, Rossis provides a collection that is faced-paced without being shallow. As with many of Rossis’ other collections, this book contains several short stories interspersed between sections of another. ‘You're in for a Ride’: an ancient creature seeks the last few victims it needs to complete … Continue reading You’re in for a Ride: A Collection of Science Fiction Short Stories

Honest Fibs by Nicholas C. Rossis

Mixing metaphysics, brutal action, humour, and sudden reveals, but maintaining a focus on accessible characters, Rossis offers a collection of speculative fiction that will appeal to many palates. This collection contains five short stories set within the eponymous sixth, along with four stories extracted from his other collections. 'Honest Fibs': When the fish stop biting, … Continue reading Honest Fibs by Nicholas C. Rossis

Infinite Waters by Nicholas C. Rossis

Focussing on aspects of character and the narrator’s immediate perceptions rather than complex details and world building, Rossis creates a series of tales that are about immediate challenges rather than the epic expanses of fresh worlds. Several of the stories include a twist ending. While I have attempted to avoid mentioning those details, this review … Continue reading Infinite Waters by Nicholas C. Rossis

The Power of Six by Nicholas C. Rossis

Unafraid to place questions of ethics and perception at the heart of the story, Rossis creates a collection that is more than weird aliens and heroic fights. Several of the stories have a surprise ending: while I have attempted to avoid details, there might be accidental spoilers contained within. The collection contains six short stories … Continue reading The Power of Six by Nicholas C. Rossis

Rise of the Prince by Nicholas C. Rossis

Combining a well-realised twist on devolved civilisations with a firm grasp of the power of emotional and spiritual factors in shaping action, Rossis creates a possible future humanity that seems plausible on both a logical and visceral level. When the colony ship Perseus crash-landed only a handful of humans survived. Three hundred years later humanity … Continue reading Rise of the Prince by Nicholas C. Rossis

Nonlocal Science Fiction, Issue #1 by Daniel J. Dombrowski (ed.)

Taking as his guide that the best short stories are those that focus on a single idea, Dombrowski has gathered both hard sci-fi and softer, more speculative fiction, from new and independent authors. This choice of focus rather than style or subject will make the magazine a good source of fresh authors for science-fiction fans … Continue reading Nonlocal Science Fiction, Issue #1 by Daniel J. Dombrowski (ed.)

Your Fish Has Got Away and other Unusual Translations

There is something both pleasing and humbling about the varied metaphors.

As a suitable coincidence, the talented Neil Murton was inspired by the feast of St Cyril to write upon the same theme, albeit with a more metaphysical bent.

Nicholas C. Rossis

The original, short version of this post was written for the Book Marketing Tools blog. This longer version was written as a guest post for Vanessa Finaughty’s blog.

From the blog of Nicholas C. Rossis, author of science fiction, the Pearseus epic fantasy series and children's booksOne of the best ideas of Douglas Adams had to be the Babelfish. Just stick it into your ear and presto – you can now understand all languages. One of the things that always made we wonder, though, was how Babelfish might translate terms. For example, if someone said their computer has crashed, would it conjure an image of a person flinging their PC out of a window?

Now, I may be Greek, but I can easily understand what someone means when they say that their computer has crashed or that they didn’t save their file. Our culture and education have taught us these things. What about the rest of humanity, though?

Enter a lovely Economist article, describing the pitfalls of translating cultural idioms. When Mozilla tried to…

View original post 570 more words

Year 18: The Schism by Nicholas C. Rossis

Combining issues of daily survival and a real sense of threat with questions of what the role of law and government should be, Rossis creates a story that is both engaging and thought-provoking. The spaceship Pearseus was supposed to celebrate New Years 2099 in style. Instead it crashes on an unexplored planet. The survivors start … Continue reading Year 18: The Schism by Nicholas C. Rossis