The Noble Language of The Eye

You will be unsurprised to read that I think my books are good. If you know me well, or any author well, you will probably also be unsurprised to read that I have difficulty stating openly that I think my books are good. However, I realised today that waiting for people to ask before I tell them is missing an opportunity; not to sell my books, but to do something much more important.

Voices Like Candles

Matthew Graybosch wrote an interesting article yesterday about not fitting in despite appearing to be part of the majority. I might not agree with his suggestion that he doesn’t deserve congratulations for still being functional, but I wholeheartedly agree that sharing feelings of isolation is better than leaving the world in some grand gesture. Because people listening is why I don’t feel isolated.

The Beauty of Our Own Reality

PsychGuides have published a study of how the BMI of successful contestants in the Miss America contest has changed for the worst over the years, along with some of the risks of an unhealthy BMI. I can’t add to their science, but what I can do is add my voice to the side of healthy body image: none of the contestants is my ideal.

10 Reasons you stop writing your book and why to ignore them

All of these are true of writing as more than a hobby, but they also apply to making any hobby more than a pastime.

Even ‘You’ve written yourself into a hole’: our experience changes constantly which changes both what we can do and what we see as worthy, so it might be surprising how infrequently our plans to progress need revision.

Suffolk Scribblings

Writers block copy

There isn’t a writer alive that hasn’t stopped writing, whether as a planned break or simply because they got out of the habit. It’s happened to me in the past and I’m sure it will happen again in the future. When it does, we often come up with excuses as to justify why we’ve stopped writing, but the majority of the time that’s all they are, excuses. The trick is recognising them for the lies they are and dealing with them. Here are the ten most common reasons people stop writing and why you should ignore them.

1 Your writing isn’t very good

You’ve just read back what you’ve been slaving over for the past few weeks/months and are horrified at how poor it is, so much so you’re questioning whether you’re a writer at all. I’ll let you into a little secret, every writer does this. OK, there may be a couple…

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Covering Your Bases

Many author-publishers design their own book covers. And on any writing forum, you will find best-selling author-publishers discussing whether it is the biggest false economy those people make, potentially even more incorrect than not obtaining professional editing. Taken as a balancing act between cost (in time or money) and increased sales, there are good arguments in favour of spending the time writing and the money on a cover. However, I believe there are other less tangible outcomes than sales from a cover design; such that even designing a cover knowing it will never be used can be a useful step to take.

Who Doesn’t Watch The Writers?

One of the most common pieces of writing advice is to not write and edit at the same time; and both scientific studies on the parallel use of different areas of the brain and anecdotal evidence of increased speed, word-counts, and other measures seem to justify its ubiquity. I have certainly produced more since I moved editing to after my first drafts were finished. However, it is trickier than it seems; in what was an entirely unintended demonstration, I changed several words in this paragraph before I had finished writing it. One of the common suggestions to overcome this desire to not leave work without a flaw for even a moment, is to write without being able to see what you are writing. But this can be counter productive.

Not That Type of Perky

Most rational discussions of stereotypes in either role-playing games or fiction writing quickly include the idea of a character as wish-fulfilment; as either the creator’s idea or how they would like to be, or how they would like their ideal partner to be. A similar, if darker, theory is sometimes raised in discussions of discrimination. But both these are things of which creators are well aware, and so will often be sought out in editing. It might be the trivial issues that actually most strongly constrain a writer’s unconscious.

My Own Personal Fauxpocalypse

I have just finished compiling edits for the last story but one in Fauxpocalypse; so it is all coming together. As a definite release date becomes ever more real, I am filled with ambivalence: the pleasure of forthcoming publication wars with the fear of what is still to do. For the last story to be edited is mine.

The Balance of Favours

I have been having computer issues for some time. Fortunately, my system computer has remained stable for several days, so might finally be returned to its previous functionality. Unfortunately, I it has caused me not only the stress of an ailing computer, but also the stress of potentially not being the friend I usually am.

Write Stuff

One of the community’s I am a part of had a thread using KM Weiland’s list of 15 signs you might not be acting like a writer as a checklist. The article contains some useful advice, so I recommend taking a glance if you do write. Although I do not believe being an author is a matter of ticking boxes, I thought I would share my compliance (or lack thereof) for people who are interested in me.