Triggering a Dream

Earlier this month, my review of Marillion's B'Sides Themselves appeared in Issue 7 of Mythaxis Review. As this is the only album I can remember ever reviewing, it will be no surprise to hear it is significant to me. However, the ways it is significant have shifted over time. I bought the album on cassette … Continue reading Triggering a Dream

Little, Big: Talking with John Crowley

A little while ago, Mythaxis Review offered me the chance to interview John Crowley. The finished conversation has just been released. While perhaps best known for Little, Big (winner of one of the several World Fantasy Awards that he holds), John Crowley’s work spans many genres, fiction and non-fiction, books and documentary films. In conversation … Continue reading Little, Big: Talking with John Crowley

Shining a Spotlight on Me

The soon-to-be-released second issue of Mythaxis includes an interview with me. But if you can't wait, the publisher has made the interview available for free here. The article focuses on indie publishing, so if you're interested in the technical side of the writing business you can find my thoughts here.

Casey Douglass: Dark Ambient Review: Hastur

Those of you who've read Bloody Red Nose will already be familiar with Casey Douglass. However, what you might not have gathered from his deliciously distilled tale is that he shares my taste for Yog-Sothothery. So, it seemed a public service to ease you into the new arbitrary time division by mentioning his review of … Continue reading Casey Douglass: Dark Ambient Review: Hastur

Submission Call: All These Shiny Worlds III

Following the success of All These Shiny Worlds and All These Shiny Worlds II, anthologies showcasing some of the best independent fantasy and science-fiction short stories, Jefferson Smith is compiling a third volume. Unlike the previous two, which were nomination-only, this one will be open to all subscribers to his Liar's Hearth Newsletter. Further details … Continue reading Submission Call: All These Shiny Worlds III

Red Shirts & Reviews | mishaburnett

"Haven’t you always wanted to be part of the shadowy underworld of outlaw spellcasters? To live the life of a magical gangster, full of danger, intrigue, unlawful conjurations, and bucketfuls of cold hard cash?" — Red Shirts & Reviews | mishaburnett Misha Burnett, one of my favourite authors, is offering a chance for your name … Continue reading Red Shirts & Reviews | mishaburnett

Dark Corner Newsstand Open for Business

I like short stories. I like reading them and I like writing them. And, whether you’re here for my reviews or to find out more about the stories I write, I suspect many of you like a good short story too.

So, I wanted to share this new project from the talented Misha Burnett: a repository of magazines and anthologies featuring short fiction.

That shared, I’m off to read something weird and abrupt.

Dark Corner Newsstand

This is something that I’ve been meaning to do for a while now. If you got here from my other blog, you know that I feel passionately about the need for a healthy market for short fiction. To this end I have been actively seeking indie magazines and anthologies that publish short genre fiction.

The market is growing fast now, and I’ve gotten to the point where I need a way to organize all the links I have into one place.

This is the place. Please pardon my dust, this is a work in progress.

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Some Notes Towards A Meta-epistemological Manifesto

Genre collapses if viewed too closely: urban fantasy has computers, smart-phones, and such, so contains both the science-fiction of a past generation and the seeds of the hard science-fiction of the present; action films have a handsome hero overcoming obstacles before getting the girl at the end, so are romance. Genre boundaries don’t exist.

And this article from Misha Burnett shows we should perhaps be grateful they don’t.

mishaburnett

I had an epiphany today.

I have always mistrusted the concept of genre.  It has seemed to me to be both a hobble and a crutch.  By which I mean that by accepting a specific genre designation an author restricted her or his writing to an abbreviated range, while at the same time adjuring readers to carry the story past certain difficulties by imposing on an unearned suspension of disbelief.

This did not seem to be a good bargain to me–from either side.

Today it occurred to me that this unnatural division of stories into either this thing or that thing but never both at once mirrors the description that G K Chesterton gives of post-Christian philosophies in his book Orthodoxy.

Chesterton says it much more eloquently that I am about to (which is why I supplied you with the link) but in essence his thesis is that Christianity…

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The Bullet Catcher’s Author: An Interview with Rod Duncan

Ladies, Gentlemen, and Non-Gendered Polite Mechanicals, Davetopia is proud to present for your edification the question-answering talents of Mr Rod Duncan. Marvel as he forms a coherent sentence! Gasp in awe at his ability to sustain an argument! Observe, if you dare, the innermost workings of his mind! 1. Your official bio is below. But … Continue reading The Bullet Catcher’s Author: An Interview with Rod Duncan